‘Baby diet’ doesn’t mean eating pureed food, but could help you change eating habits

If you’re trying to get back on track with good health habits, you may want to consider the eating habits of babies or toddlers.

“The premise of the baby diet is: let’s take cues from the toddler and follow some rules that we really devote a lot of time to with our babies and apply them to yourself,” said registered dietitian Nicolette Pace.

First, watch the calories you drink.

“No sugary drinks, so basically every doctor advises not to give your baby sugary drinks so why are we drinking them?” she explained.

For example, coffee-flavored drinks that have lots of sugar and dairy products contain lots of calories.

“Literally, you’re looking at two and a half meals by the time you’re done with some of these drinks,” said Pace.

Also, consider your portions and stick to an eating schedule.

“Some of these tools that we use for our toddler to feed them, use them for yourself, even the sectioned plates, it’s all those little compartments,” said Pace. “You have a strict mealtime schedule for them so let’s try following it for ourselves. This is also to prevent this irregular eating which also leads to an increased level of hunger and then you wind up overeating.”

If you’re a parent of a toddler, consider sharing mealtimes. Babies tend to eat in one place and so should you.

“Eating together, even if it’s a different texture of food, it will foster a bonding,” said Pace. “I suggest you go only where there’s a table. As you start to squeeze down areas of the house where you do have meals and food you’ll see that you’ll have less of a trigger, less of an influence to grab this and that.”

She said incorporating these suggestions could boost your weight loss.

“Some people can lose a pound a week depending on their metabolic rate. Others can really go for that two,” said Pace.

Pace said it’s also a good idea to wrap your eating three hours before bedtime to help your digestive system.

Nicolette Featured in First Time Parent Magazine

http://www.firsttimeparentmagazine.com/

  

LATF USA: Five Breakfast Facts You Didn’t Know About Your Cereal & Oatmeal

5 breakfast nutrition facts, nicolette pace

So many questions when it comes to the famous ‘most important meal of the day:’ breakfast. 

Nicolette M. Pace MS, RDN, CDE, CBC,CDN, CFCS ,FAND is the founder of NutriSource Inc., which provides high quality education, counseling and nutrition services. She has also served as Director of Clinical Nutrition at the NYHQ/Silvercrest Center where she provided both administrative and direct care for sub-acute and chronically ill patients.

Here are 5 Breakfast need-to-know’s from Nicolette: 

Kids Cereal

These sugary treats have classically been under fire by health advocates. Today’s versions have added fiber (and vitamins) to make them more health friendly. Unfortunately though many still deliver over 10 grams of sugar per serving and do not contain other nutrients (healthy fat and protein) your child needs for brain growth and development.

Unsweetened Grain Cereal

Don’t be fooled into thinking that just because there is no added sugar in these flakes or puffs that it is a healthy choice. Most in this category are refined starches and do not have intact whole grain nutrients and fiber for good health, digestion and appetite control. Since they are light in weight (1 cup serving = one ounce= 110 calories) you’ll need several portions to feel full.

Adult Healthy Cereal

Here’s where we take those refined flakes and puffs and add-in a variety of ingredients such as crunchy nuts, tasty dried fruits, chocolate or other candy-like morsels with the belief that these super food ingredients make them healthy. What you should realize is that is gives you a speed pass to more calories (50% more) in the same small serving which will outweigh the nutrient value of the added ingredients.

Instant Oatmeal

All oatmeal is not created equal. With the convenience of instant you are relaxing the health benefit. Processing methods involve cutting, rolling, pressing and partially cooking whole oats so that essentially “pre-digests” the starch making it more glycemic (fast absorbing, greater blood sugar impact) . Be even more careful with instant oatmeal with added sugar or sweeteners as this reinforces sugar cravings.

Granola

This health food craze leftover is still going strong in health appeal but with a meager 1/3 cup portion size it is also one of the most calorie dense choices at 125-175 calories per serving. While most granolas have healthy intact whole grains they are combined with “trail mix” type ingredients which contribute excess sugar and in some instances unhealthy trans fats. This is a cereal where you must be very careful in measuring and mindful of how you use it.

10 Super Smart Superfoods Your Kids Will Love

10 Super Smart Superfoods Your Kids Will Love

This post may contain affiliate links. Read full disclosure here.

by Nicolette M. Pace MS, RDN, CDE, CBC, CDN, CFCS, FAND

Having trouble getting your kids to eat healthily? When you package these superfood hits into a child’s menu you can be sure it’s a surefire way of giving them the nutrients they need and show them great nutrition is just around the corner!

1. Basil:

This superfood packs in vitamins A, C, and K, iron, potassium, and calcium– kids can grow their own basil at home. Toss it on pasta sauces or pizza! It’s rich in plant chemicals, chlorophyll, and other happy mood plant compounds.

2. Cocoa:

Add cocoa powder and honey to kefir for a healthy quick breakfast for kids who won’t sit still to eat a meal. Or a cup of hot cocoa (at least 70 percent pure cocoa) promotes oral health and helps to protect delicate skin from sun damage over time. You can also sprinkle cocoa powder on fruit, snacks, and desserts for a healthy punch of flavor. Plant chemicals and antioxidants increase concentration and decrease inflammation!

3. Black Beans:

Adults aren’t the only ones who suffer from high cholesterol, they just get checked more often than kids. Black beans help kids keep cholesterol levels down and provide plenty of calcium and protein to boot. Make a tasty black bean dip with some fresh veggies for a fun snack.

4. Cinnamon:

This superfood is great sprinkled on breakfast foods. it regulates blood sugar, which will keep energy from crashing after breakfast in the middle of a school day, tastes great, and is so easy to use. Its natural sweetness is a plus and goes with so many foods and beverages!

5. Avocado:

Avocados are full of good fat. Kids need a daily diet of 30% monosaturated fat and a little avocado a day provides more than enough. Use it like ordinary mayo for a great mix-in to creamy dips and sauces or sliced fresh for an afternoon snack. Guacamole is a no brainer for kids!

6.Tomato:

Here’s a switch, a tomato a day can keep cancer away. That’s right, the plant version of vitamin A can best fight off all kinds of stressors and the potassium they contain helps to boost energy and stabilize hydration. In-season tomatoes are amazing with basil and olive oil or lightly sautee for a very tasty sauce for pasta, fish, or veggies!

7. Fruit:

A sweet spot you don’t want to ignore, kids have a natural liking for fruit and its energy-boosting plus. Encouraging eating fruit curbs drinking sugary beverages and snacks. Go for seasonal fun and plan a harvesting trip to a local orchard or bring your kiddies to the local greengrocers to pick out what they want. A variety of colors provides kids with essential vitamins and minerals they need to grow and fiber to keep their bodies healthy. Introduce your kids to a daily fruit plate at a young age and they will probably continue the habit into adulthood.

8.Sweet Potatoes:

These orange tubers are high in Vitamin A which helps kids develop healthy vision and eyes. And they’re deliciously roasted, mashed, or baked. For an amazing marshmallow flavor, use vanilla extract and honey for a not to be missed sweet treat.

9. Flaxseed:

Flaxseed is bursting with Omega-3 fatty acids that little guys need to grow their brains to their full potential. Buy it ground and sprinkle it over their cereal or add 1/4 cup to their favorite baked-good recipe. They’ll get better nutrition without even knowing it.

10. Oatmeal:

Kids who start their day with oatmeal concentrate better in school all day. oatmeal breaks down slowly to give continual bursts of energy over a long period of time. Add honey, nuts, or chocolate chips to make it more kid-friendly, for a great way to use oatmeal be sure to check out the recipe section for a granola recipe the whole family will love. About Nicolette M. Pace MS, RDN, CDE, CBC,CDN, CFCS ,FANDNicolette founded NutriSource Inc. ( www.nutrisource.org )  in 2002 to provide high-quality education, counseling, and nutrition services for a diverse community population. Prior to founding NutriSource Inc, she served as Director of Clinical Nutrition at the NYHQ/Silvercrest Center where she provided both administrative and direct care for sub-acute and chronically ill patients. Nicolette was a key member of performance improvement projects and as Chair of the Nutrition Committee; significant positive changes were made in the standard of care.  Nicolette has been featured in CBS, ABC, NBC, Fox News, the New York Times, Seventeen, Fitness, Men’s Journal, More, Dr. Oz, Everyday Health, AOL, IVillage, Health, Shape, and other magazines. She is also a contributing writer for Minerva Place, as well as an adjunct professor of Nutrition at CUNY and Touro Colleges. She believes in emphasizing a holistic approach toward food, nutrition, and preventative healthcare.